AMAC in the Media

AMAC Magazine Exclusive – Three Great Places to Retire – And Some Factors to Consider

Posted on Saturday, October 2, 2021
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The Association of Mature American Citizens
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11 Comments
retire

Retirement is the stage of life where people permanently leave the workforce and seek out new opportunities to spend more time with family, pursue hobbies, or travel. In the United States, the traditional retirement age at which one may receive full Social Security benefits is currently 66 and 10 months. People who retire and no longer work may depend on Social Security, 401(k) distributions, savings, benefits, pensions, or a combination of these resources to live. Since people in the US are generally living longer than ever before, except for a dip due to COVID-19, it is important that retirement money lasts. The recent pandemic unexpectedly drove a significant number of Americans into early retirement.

Read the Full Article in the Digital Edition of the AMAC Magazine

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Kim
Kim
2 years ago

For several years, I’ve been looking for a place to call home. Taking care of my elderly mother complicated matters, so the search had to be delayed until after she’d passed, which happened last year. And then Covid brought its own problems.

Finally, in the coming week I will start my move to a small town in North Carolina. I sooo look forward to moving away from this city to a quieter, cleaner part of the state. I’ll even go back to work. People still have Trump signs and flags in their yards and understand what America is all about so much better than our local “progressives”. I’ll also enjoy leaving blue city politics and the policies that are ruining this area. Violent crime is way up here as it is in most dem-led cities. Good riddance to that.

This little town has everything I’ll need–shopping, restaurants, theater, doctors/hospitals, community events, farmers markets, a top 5 in the state school system, lovely people, and cheap housing! I urge all of you wanting to relocate to consider small towns. The house I bought is “livable” and cost less than half of those median house prices quoted in the article. For people like me, who are not wealthy, a small town fixer is just the ticket.

Sperlings Best Places and CityData are 2 websites I used to gather facts. I’m not sure they’re up-to-the-minute current, but they can give comparisons for any variables of interest. They detail weather, political leanings, crime statistics, health care accessibility, job outlook, housing costs, the number of earthquakes… Also, driving around the neighborhoods, eating at the restaurants, buying the local newspapers, chatting with people on the street…all give a good indication whether that area is suitable.

Kim
Kim
2 years ago

For several years, I’ve been looking for a place to call home. Taking care of my elderly mother complicated matters, so the search had to be delayed until after she’d passed, which happened last year. And then Covid brought its own problems.

Finally, in the coming week I will start my move to a small town in North Carolina. I sooo look forward to moving away from this city to a quieter, cleaner part of the state. I’ll even go back to work. People still have Trump signs and flags in their yards and understand what America is all about so much better than our local “progressives”. I’ll also enjoy leaving blue city politics and the policies that are ruining this area. Violent crime is way up here as it is in most dem-led cities. Good riddance to that.

This little town has everything I’ll need–shopping, restaurants, theater, doctors/hospitals, community events, farmers markets, a top 5 in the state school system, lovely people, and cheap housing! I urge all of you wanting to relocate to consider small towns. The house I bought is “livable” and cost less than half of those median house prices quoted in the article. For people like me, who are not wealthy, a small town fixer is just the ticket.

Sperlings Best Places and CityData are 2 websites I used to gather facts. I’m not sure they’re up-to-the-minute current, but they can give comparisons for any variables of interest. They detail weather, political leanings, crime statistics, health care accessibility, job outlook, housing costs, the number of earthquakes… Also, driving around the neighborhoods, eating at the restaurants, buying the local newspapers, chatting with people on the street…all give a good indication whether that area is suitable.

Deborah Gabelton
Deborah Gabelton
2 years ago

My granddaughter “canceled” me again for what I said about non-European immigrants so long story short I can no longer use my i-pad to read the article. If someone could copy and paste the text Inyo the comments that would be helpful

Faith
Faith
2 years ago

A Word of Caution: Dems like to move to beautiful Red areas once they’ve destroyed their own cities. Small towns and burbs are the destination. I know because, for the last 24 years, I have lived in what was once a “small town” in Texas. Then we got swamped beginning around 2017. By 2020 there came a TSUNAMI of Dems from states and cities like… California, NYC, Boston, Vermont, Rhode Island, Portland OR, Seattle, Washington DC etc. In addition to thousands of people from India and Asia (thanks to our “small town” being advertised, by Realtors in newspapers of those countries, as a “great place to live in America”). And when the overseas transplants vote, most vote for Democrats… Even though their values tend to line up mostly with conservatives–go figure.????It didn’t help that Money magazine for years constantly advertised our small town as a great place to “retire or raise a family”.The result? We went from about 25K population to over 200K. And our neighboring small towns swelled up as well. Our county went from barely 100K population to over 1.2 million people with the bulk arriving in the last 3-4 years. Our home prices went from $130K. 3-4 bedroom 2,000 sf home to almost $600K for that same home just a few short years later. Traffic is horrendous and those born and/or raised here can no longer afford it. In another year or two we may be completely priced out as well. About 3 years ago after we saw many signs of our neighborhood tanking (police frequenting our neighbors etc.)since Great Recession, we had to make the painful decision to sell our home. Tried purchasing another home in 2020 only to be beat out by Cash buyers from overseas, Investors and those coming from NY and Cali offering CASH and $40-80K above asking price. I saw small homes (1,000-1500sf) completely falling apart sell for about $400K. Those same houses just three years ago would have sold for about $140K as “distressed”. The ones in better shape can go as high as $600K.It’s truly insane what is happening. Then we think to ourselves, “what’s the use of moving to another “small town” 45-60 minutes away if the same thing will just happen again?”We were once seen as “country bumpkins” by the elitist leftists now they want to live here.????

KeithLPinette
KeithLPinette
2 years ago

love you guys

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