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Salad Chart & Dressing Recipes

Posted on Tuesday, May 7, 2024
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by AMAC, D.J. Wilson
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Salad Chart & Dressing Recipes

Health Benefits

Salads are an important part of a healthy human diet. They are particularly healthy for older Americans who wish to eat well and reduce weight gain associated with aging. The USDA recommends about two to three cups of vegetables daily for women 51 or older, and about two-and-a-half to three-and-a-half cups per day for men 51 and older. For more details, visit https://www.myplate.gov/.

Powerful & tasty

Salads are nutritional dishes, largely containing combinations of vitamins like A, C, and K. Depending upon lettuce type, salads may also contain other wonderful elements such as B vitamins and potassium. Note the types of lettuce and salad additions affect nutritional values, antioxidant profiles, density, flavor, texture and more. Additionally, to watch calories, one should opt for healthy dressings or limit dressing amounts.

Get creative!

Salads are refreshing dishes made of fresh ingredients. They frequently contain a variety of leafy greens, vegetables, proteins, toppings, and dressings. Enjoy this chart to create your own one-of-a-kind salad:

Lettuce (Pick one green or a salad combo)

Vegetables (Pick your favorites)

Protein & Toppings (Pick your favorites)

Vinaigrette dressings (Pick one)

Whisk together these ingredients: 

Arugula (Peppery flavor and spinach taste)

Bell peppers (Diced/chopped)

Apple slices

————————–

Avocado

————————–

Bacon (Crispy bits)

Balsamic:

¼ cup balsamic vinegar

2 Tbsp. mild, creamy mustard

1 Tbsp. minced shallot

¼ tsp. salt

Cracked black pepper to taste

Then…

Drizzle in 2/3 cup olive oil

Baby greens (Delicate and refreshing – harvested before they mature) *

Broccoli (Chopped)

Cheese

—————————

Chicken (Poached, grilled, fried, baked, breaded or un-breaded)

Basil:

¼ cup mild red wine vinegar

1 Tbsp. basil

1 Tbsp. mild, creamy mustard

1 Tbsp. minced garlic  

¼ tsp. salt

Then….

Drizzle in 2/3 cup olive oil

Baby spinach (Slightly sweeter variety than regular spinach – also harvested before fully maturing)

Cabbage (Shredded or finely sliced)

Chickpeas

Dijon:

¼ cup mild red wine vinegar

2 Tbsp. spicy Dijon mustard

1 Tbsp. minced onion

¼ tsp. salt

Then…

Drizzle in 2/3 cup olive oil

Butter lettuce such as Bibb or Boston (Tender, smooth, silky, delicate, and mild)

Carrots (Sliced or diced)

Craisins

Dill:

¼ cup mild red wine vinegar

1 Tbsp. dill

1 Tbsp. mild, creamy mustard

1 Tbsp. minced shallot

¼ tsp. salt

Then…

Drizzle in 2/3 cup olive oil

Escarole (Sturdy bitter leafy green) **

Cauliflower (Crumbles or chopped)

Croutons

Garlic:

¼ cup mild red wine vinegar

1 ½ Tbsp. minced garlic

1 ½ Tbsp. mild, creamy mustard

½ tsp. ground sage

¼ tsp. salt

Cracked black pepper to taste

Then…

Drizzle in 2/3 cup olive oil

Frisée (Feathery with a mild bitter taste)

Celery (Sliced or diced)

Eggs (Cooked, hardboiled, or crumbled)

Lemon:

¼ cup white balsamic vinegar

Juice of one lemon

1 Tbsp. grated lemon zest

2 Tbsp. honey

1 Tbsp. minced garlic

1 Tbsp. mild, creamy mustard

¼ tsp. salt

Cracked black pepper to taste

Then…

Drizzle in 2/3 cup olive oil

Green leaf lettuce (May be ruffled and has a mild to sweet flavor.)

Cucumbers (Sliced)

Fish (Cooked, examples: salmon, tuna)

Orange:

¼ cup champagne vinegar

Juice of one orange

1 Tbsp. grated orange zest

2 Tbsp. honey

1 Tbsp. minced shallot

1 Tbsp. Dijon mustard

¼ tsp. salt

Cracked black pepper to taste

Then…

Drizzle in 2/3 cup olive oil

Iceberg (Crisp and juicy yet mild)

Mushrooms (Sliced)

Nuts (Almonds, cashews, peanuts, walnuts)

Oregano:

¼ cup mild red wine vinegar

1 Tbsp. oregano

1 Tbsp. mild, creamy mustard

1 Tbsp. minced garlic  

¼ tsp. salt

Then….

Drizzle in 2/3 cup olive oil

Kale (Sturdy, earthy, nutty, and slightly bitter)

Onions (Red, green)

Seeds

Red wine vinegar:

¼ cup red wine vinegar

2 Tbsp. mild, creamy mustard

1 Tbsp. minced shallot

¼ tsp. salt

Cracked black pepper to taste

Then…

Drizzle in 2/3 cup olive oil

Radicchio (Red, bitter, and spicy)

Radishes (Chopped)

Tofu

Shallot:

¼ cup red wine vinegar

2 Tbsp. mild, creamy mustard

2 Tbsp. minced shallot

1 Tbsp. tarragon

¼ tsp. salt

Cracked black pepper to taste

Then…

Drizzle in 2/3 cup olive oil

Red leaf lettuce (Mild to sweet flavor with red or purple tips)

Tomatoes (Grape, cherry, or diced)

Watercress (Leaves/tender stem)

White wine vinegar:

¼ cup white wine vinegar

2 Tbsp. mild, creamy mustard

1 Tbsp. minced shallot

¼ tsp. salt

Cracked black pepper to taste

Then…

Drizzle in 2/3 cup olive oil

 

*Per Healthline.com, spinach is not technically a lettuce, rather it’s a type of leafy, green vegetable.

**Per organicfacts.net, escarole is technically a type of endive and member of the chicory family. It is often mistaken for a type of lettuce.

 Top chef tips for salad success:

  • Vinaigrettes are easy to make – always taste and play with the formula before adding it to a salad!
  • Depending upon taste preferences, one may slightly reduce the vinegar and/or slightly increase the oil proportions.
  • Oil and vinegar can separate – so a great way to mix them is to put the ingredients in a mason jar and shake them together!
  • Choose high quality olive oils (regular or extra virgin) and play around with flavored oils.
  • Vinegars come in many different flavors and have unique profiles.
  • When adding ingredients with high acid content, such as lemons or orange, do add some honey to balance out the flavors.
  • In addition to honey, maple syrup and agave sweetener can help round out the flavors of vinaigrettes.
  • In a pinch, one may add small amounts of table sugar to mellow dressings.
  • Add salt and pepper to your liking. For salt free dressings, simply omit this ingredient.
  • Also, play around with herbs and salad toppings to come up with new great recipe variations.
  • Allow guests with specific dietary needs to choose their own salad toppings and dress their own salads.

Best tip of all – How to stop overdressing your salad:

  • When dressing a salad, never pour the dressing directly onto the lettuce. Rather, slowly pour it on the sides of the bowl and gently toss the lettuce into the dressing. NEVER pour it all on at once. Instead, pour a little at a time using the technique just described. Toss the lettuce to gently coat – and taste as you go. This helps avoid overdressing a salad. Alternatively, to keep lettuce crisp and to let guests put on amounts they like, simply serve the dressing on the side.

 

We hope you enjoyed this salad chart and have opportunities to play around to come up with your own recipe creations! Seeking to learn about some leafy green superfoods? If so, click here.

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