Government Watch / Politics

Students Must Take Responsibility for Their Debt

student loans garnishment social security benefits

Lending money is not, as they say, rocket science. 

According to the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis, in the last quarter of 2021, of the total of all outstanding business loans from all commercial banks, 1.08% were delinquent. Per the Federal Reserve Bank of New York, as of second quarter 2021, a little over 2% of the $1.4 trillion outstanding in auto loans were delinquent. Yet in the student loan market, totaling around $1.6 trillion, not that different from the total size of the auto loan market, an average of 15% are in default at any given time, per the Education Data Initiative.

It should be clear what the problem is.

Auto lenders make sure that those to whom they lend can and will pay back the loan. They are careful because if the borrower defaults, the lender loses. But if, tomorrow, President Joe Biden or Sens. Elizabeth Warren or Bernie Sanders decide that it is not fair that there are Americans without new cars and managed to get government guarantees for auto loans, is there any doubt that there would be a dramatic rise in defaults on car loans?

Those lending wouldn’t care who they lend to because they wouldn’t take the loss on a default. You and I, we taxpayers, would, as we will if Biden and his party have their way to wipe out student loans. Of course, “wipe out” is not the right terminology. Debts don’t get wiped out. They just get transferred to someone else. In the case of government guarantees, that someone else is taxpayers.

The concept of student loans backed by the government is another child of the allegedly compassionate 1960s. Doesn’t it make sense to help the less fortunate obtain funds to pay for college? But as many theologians and philosophers have noted, the greatest charitable act is to help another individual take control of their own life. Teaching personal responsibility is the most valuable gift that one can provide another.

Our American compassion, our moral compass, has gone awry. A child growing up in America today looks around and finds himself or herself in a nation where debt is larger than the entire economy, and still growing. But just as inflation shows that the costs of fiscal irresponsibility cannot be hidden, so the costs of teaching our youth that personal responsibility is irrelevant cannot be hidden. It manifests in the destructive behavior we see now.

The Wall Street Journal reported that one student loan adviser told them, “I’m seeing them say, ‘I’m going to take out more loans now and go buy GameStop stock with it because it’s going to get forgiven anyway.'” A new Gallup survey reports “32% of currently enrolled students pursuing a bachelor’s degree report they have considered withdrawing from their program for a semester or more in the past six months.” Thirty-six percent attribute this to financial reasons. But 76% attribute to “emotional stress.”

Of course, the universities love this. What business wouldn’t think the government subsidizing purchase of its product is a great idea?

Per the American Enterprise Institute, from January 2000 to December 2021, college tuition costs increased 175% and college textbook costs increased 150%. Over the same period, the consumer price index for all items increased 65.5%; prices of cars, household furnishings and clothing remained relatively unchanged; and cellphone services were down 40%, computer software down 71% and television sets down 97%. Per Education Data Initiative, highest default rate — 26.33% — is among arts and humanities majors attending nonselective schools. Can anyone really think such loans make sense?

We need to help our youth who want education to get it. But it must be done prudently. Teaching our youth that they don’t need to pay back debts is not a good start. Misguided efforts by Biden and his party to cancel obligations on student loans should be vigorously opposed.

Star Parker is president of the Center for Urban Renewal and Education and host of the weekly television show “Cure America with Star Parker.”

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Kim
1 month ago

Let’s not forget that it was Obama in 2010 who outlawed the federal student loan program which guaranteed low interest loans from private lending institutions. All student loans now had to originate in the Dept. of Education. That allowed the feds to raise interest rates for those who could pay and also for the marxists among them to win votes from those who could not by planning this whole debt forgiveness debacle.

“Debt forgiveness”? It’s more like “shifting the burden” to you and me, who fund the federal government and all their goody bags. Why should we have to pay for someone else’s education? Look at what most of those “institutions of higher learning” are churning out and ask yourself, “Was it worth the price of admission?”

Rich C
1 month ago

It’s called moral responsibility. A person’s word used to mean something. Working for a better future regardless of the cost used to be an American tradition. Did our parents ever tell us: If you want something bad enough, it’s worth working for? When student debt is forgiven, then all “students” must have “free education”. But…….where does it end? Most Americans have a financial burden with their mortgage. Maybe even the car loan for that electric car. Maybe their overrun credit card debt. Etc., etc, etc. It just never ends! Of course that is what the socialists want. Then, everything can be owned and managed by the federal government because it will all be “FREE”. How convenient. See a pattern here?

Bwa Ha
1 month ago

I obtained my bachelor’s and masters degree without having to take on student loans. I used a portion of my G.I. bill and money earned from my every day toils. I didn’t secure any loans from the feds, state or locally. When I received my degrees they were paid in full upon graduation. Yeah, part of those costs were absorbed by the G.I. Bill and the rest was paid via my earnings (wages) that I saved to help defray the costs associated with the education received.

There’s hundreds, if not thousands of other folks just like me who did the same thing. I don’t understand rationale folks who secure education loans use to justify their failures to repay those loans. As mentioned, there’s other ways to obtain funding for college education without securing loans. However, if loans are obtained then yeah, they should be repaid in full in a timely manner. IMHO

MAGA2024! TRUMP2024!
FJB! LET’S GO BRANDON!

Robert Zuccaro
1 month ago

Do I get the $25,000 I paid 15 years ago back or does my measily trade school certification have to pay for Biff and Buffy’s Yale gender studies masters degree? Luckily me two stupid too know wot class elitism iz.

Tom W
1 month ago

As one that has paid student loans, it is not the loan, but the horrible interest rate and the daily calculation. If the interest rate was a reasonable, simple interest rate, it would not be such a big issue. A minimum payment is truly negative amortization. If the student is not watching, in five years they will owe more than the original loan. A travesty of math equations!

Dave
1 month ago
Reply to  Tom W

You seem surprised that the same people who can’t balance a budget is pedaling this garbage to an even more set of nomads…

Smike
1 month ago
Reply to  Tom W

Many years ago, I lost a very good government job due to my stupidity. I did not ask for it but the gov sent me a check for my part of my retirement. It was $12,0000. 35 years later I got another very good government job and retired from it. My retirement check is docked 15% because of that $12,000 they sent me. they wanted it back. But they didn’t want only the $12,000 back, they wanted it back with interest. The amount they wanted back was over $55,000. So I loose $600 out of my retirement for the rest of my life to pay this. “loan”? And I’m suppose to feel sorry for you….

Smike
1 month ago

I guess I’m stupid because I never used the student loan to get my ADN or my BSN or my MSN. I have to congratulate those who understood they’d never have to pay the money back. These are people of vision. I would have never thought that would happen. But here we are, after I sacrificed and lived a commoner’s life, they beat the system and will get a free ride. All the money I paid for my education was foolish. I’d like to be proud of what I did but it turns out it wasn’t necessary; I didn’t have to do it. Lesson learned: Being responsible and paying your way if for chumps….

Dave
1 month ago
Reply to  Smike

Now you’re learning…

Rich C
1 month ago
Reply to  Dave

Smike, it didn’t use to be that way but I guess this is the “new normal”. Very sad.

Stephan
1 month ago

Worst part of forgiveness, the lesson learned by people is they don’t have to be responsible for anything when Uncle Sugar will save them with other people’s money.

It’s no wonder there’s so many abortions.

Dave
1 month ago
Reply to  Stephan

It’s no wonder there’s so many abortions.

…and some of them walk the earth…

Dan W.
1 month ago

Perhaps tweaking the bankruptcy laws to allow some student debt to be discharged through the bankruptcy process would be a alternative to simply forgiving the student debt with no strings attached.

Dave
1 month ago
Reply to  Dan W.

Why should it be discharged?

That isn’t going to happen, count on it!

Dan W.
1 month ago
Reply to  Dave

Most other loan debt can be discharged in bankruptcy. Perhaps a certain percentage of a student’s loan or an amount of the loan above a certain threshold could be made eligible for discharge.

While the debtor gets a new start, their bankruptcy has a negative impact on their credit rating and limits their ability to obtain future loans.

Dave
1 month ago
Reply to  Dan W.

Credit card debt isn’t dischargeable, then-Senator Joseph R. Biden, Jr. (D-Delaware) made sure of that! And people think that he didn’t do anything in the fifty years he was feeding off the government trough…silly you!

If it was good enough for the credit card companies to be protected by Lunden Alexis Roberts’ lovers father, then goddammit, it’s good enough for us!

These kids can pay full freight for the ‘fun’ they had while living it up and believing that they were getting something from teacher lounge liberals telling them high cost bedtime stories.

I don’t feel one bit sorry for these kids who think they’re better than me…let them cry in their watery soup in the food line…

Dan W.
1 month ago
Reply to  Dave

Currently there are debts that you can’t wipe out through the Chapter 7 bankruptcy process in addition to student loans such as child support, alimony, taxes, legal judgments and debt obtained through fraud but most credit card debt can be discharged.

There are two major exceptions under Chapter 7 where you cannot have a credit card debt discharged:

  • You incurred debt on your credit card as the result of fraud;
  • You used the credit card to purchase property that the creditor has a security interest in, such as a high-end appliance or piece of jewelry.

The rules for debt reorganization under Chapter 13 do keep credit card debt in play but credit card debt is given such a low priority that if you make your payments on your higher priority debts, at the end of the process, the court will usually consider all debts discharged.

Dave
1 month ago
Reply to  Dan W.

People need to be held totally responsible for their bad decisions; college is one of those really bad decisions…

Robert Zuccaro
1 month ago
Reply to  Dan W.

Here’s a thought: how about the elite upper class yuppie school they acquired their gender studies master degree forgive that debt? Seems the only ones they want to pay for this are ppl who had nothing to do with any of it: ME THE TAXPAYER.

Dan W.
1 month ago
Reply to  Robert Zuccaro

Your thought is an interesting one.

The schools should have foreseen that a certain amount of the fees that they collected from their students was from loans that would not be repaid. In that case, should the schools be forced to repay some of that money to whomever loaned their students that money ?

Sounds like a similar situation to students of those bogus “for profit” colleges that charged huge fees for worthless degrees.

Joyce
1 month ago

Students should be responsible for their student loans. They will have to be responsible for their auto loan and home mortgage; therefore, it is not right for senior citizens to pay off their student loans.,

Bwa Ha
1 month ago
Reply to  Joyce

Absolutely SPOT ON!!! Great comment Joyce!

MAGA2024! TRUMP2024!
FJB! LET’S GO BRANDON!

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