Politics / Press Releases

It’s Older Americans Month – a Time to Reflect on the Knowledge and Values Seniors Can Pass on to Children and Grandchildren

older Americans grandchildren children seniors valuesWASHINGTON, DC – America’s senior citizens are growing older by the day but they have never felt so young as they do these days, says advocate for the elderly, Dan Weber.  Dan is president of the Association of Mature American Citizens [AMAC] and points out that seniors are living longer and in better physical and mental condition than ever before.

“Men and women who turn 65 these days can expect to live well into their 80s and, according to the statistics, 40 year olds are increasingly likely to live to 100 or more.  Meanwhile, modern medicine is making strides as researchers seek treatments and even cures for the most devastating illnesses that still plague humans, including cancer and dementia.”

Caught in early stages of development, cancers such as Prostate, Testicular and even breast cancers can be put into remission.  Meanwhile, medical researchers are reporting progress in their search for pathways to effective treatments for dealing with diseases such as Alzheimer’s.

The country celebrates Older Americans Month in May and Weber called on AMAC’s membership, the over 50 crowd, to reflect on the “positive side” of growing old in the 21st Century.  And, he asked the country, as a whole, to be mindful of the contributions seniors have made to the success of “American Exceptionalism.”  Remember also that the past is prologue to the future and that the knowledge, experiences, values and guidance of previous generations are an invaluable asset for future generations.

“Therefore, it is imperative that we remain mindful of the wealth of understanding parents and grandparents have of the hows and whys of success and failure.  They can testify to the trials and errors of the past so that our kids and our grandkids will know the right paths to take in their lives.  And, that is a key element of the task of preserving our nation’s heritage and ensuring its future,” according to Weber.

Older Americans Month, says the AMAC chief, doesn’t get the attention it should.  “Some among the younger generations may not be keen on celebrating the fact that some individuals in their lives have lived to a ripe old age and have important life lessons to pass on to them.  They’ve got it wrong.  That’s not what it is all about.  It’s about those senior citizens who can and who are willing to offer insight, perspective and guidance that will stand the younger folk in good stead as they mature and get on with their lives.  So, the onus is on we seniors to take the initiative and reach out to them.”

ABOUT AMAC

The Association of Mature American Citizens [AMAC] [https://www.amac.us] is a vibrant, vital senior advocacy organization that takes its marching orders from its members.  We act and speak on their behalf, protecting their interests and offering a practical insight on how to best solve the problems they face today.  Live long and make a difference by joining us today at https://amac.us/join-amac.

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Kim

The correlation between the percentage of seniors who are still actively employed and the number of millennials who remain unfulfilled in their careers points to the very sad fact that our young people are either poorly trained, exhibit work ethic deficiencies, or have unrealistic expectations. Granted, not all. And over time, pressures of the workplace teach valuable lessons that are wisely acknowledged. These are principles that should be passed on through the generations not only in our families but also in commerce. It is incumbent upon us seniors to do this gently but generously if our culture is remain sound. After having been self-employed for decades, I moved to help my mother, and also took a job in retail. Almost all of those who were hired the same year I was were over the age of 50, and many of us were in our 60’s. Guess which age group has… Read more »

Diana Erbio

I wrote a column a few years ago for AMAC online, “Wade into the Culture Waters” that still holds true. Here’s a passage from it… “Movies, songs, books and society did celebrate those who achieved as individuals and helped others along the way.  Maybe we can turn things around if we just start encouraging members of the next generation to “reach for the stars” instead of urging them to look for someone to blame for their misfortunes. Sure, the phrase “reach for the stars” is old-fashioned,  but don’t let the idea behind it become a relic of the past – a freer past, where individuals could “blaze their own path”. Wade into the culture waters and send a rippling message of freedom and individualism to the next generations.” We should not give up on passing on the value of freedom and individualism to the next generations. We should share books,… Read more »

Eloise Burke

Old joke: How does it feel to be eighty?

Same as it did to be 18, only with something really, really wrong.

SomeWisdomHere

“Therefore, it is imperative that we remain mindful of the wealth of understanding parents and grandparents have of the hows and whys of success and failure. They can testify to the trials and errors of the past so that our kids and our grandkids will know the right paths to take in their lives. And, that is a key element of the task of preserving our nation’s heritage and ensuring its future,” according to Weber. I certainly concur with the writer here. We’re living at a time when much of what the younger generation “knows” is merely raw information that’s devoid of character and values. This comes to them quickly via their hand-held devices, and the information doesn’t include the time-worn personal stories of their parents and grandparents about the slow process of gaining success–often reached after several failures that provided first-hand learning about values as well as the steps… Read more »

Phil

Kids today, worse than in the past, are so wrapped up in themselves it’s becoming harder to communicate with them daily. I reached out to a Big Brother organization and talked to the local director. I explained that I had older experts (e.g., generals, LEO leaders, etc.) who could share life experiences with the younger kids and was told that their attention span was too short for us to speak to them. They could only handle a 5 minute conversation or less. I then explained that we intended to speak to the kids AND their ‘big brothers’. She then updated her response to say we might be able to speak to them 10 minutes?! Collectively! With the narcissistic society we are developing, it is also hard to help younger kids (millennials). They, unlike youth in earlier generations, don’t think, but KNOW better than the old geezers. I spoke to a… Read more »