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AMAC: ‘We Want a Social Security Guarantee’

 ss booklet pamby John Grimaldi – A real and dedicated solution for fixing Social Security is needed –

WASHINGTON, DC, Jan 24 – More Americans are reaching age 100 than ever before and that’s all the more reason for a renewed focus on Social Security, according to seniors advocate Dan Weber.  “These days one in 6,000 of us make it to the century mark while just 50 years ago only one in 67,000 lived that long.”

The president of the Association of Mature American Citizens was joined last week at a news conference here by Hall of Famer Fran Tarkenton to announce a new endeavor to get lawmakers on the Hill to ensure the long-term viability of Social Security.  Tarkenton said that he joined the AMAC Board of Advisors because the association seeks to “get stuff done” and ensuring the future of Social Security “needs to get done.”

In an interview after the news conference, Weber said that he, Tarkenton and the AMAC team “want a Social Security Guarantee for this generation and for future generations.  It’s not an entitlement handout, as many would suggest; it’s an annuity they paid for all their working lives, a retirement fund that was supposed to be backed by the full faith and credit of the United States.  But the government now says it may not have enough money to sustain the program for very long. The Trustee’s report says everyone’s benefits will be cut by 25% in the future unless we act now.   And, that’s not good news for a population that is living longer than expected.”

He cited U.S. Census data showing that an American born at the turn of the last century had a life expectancy of just 55 1/2 years, but that millennium kids born in 2001 can expect to live to an average ripe old age of 80-plus years.  And, he noted, people celebrating birthdays in their 90’s is up about 30%.

“Many of them might be frail, but a goodly number of them are living active lives like U.S. Navy Captain (Ret) Jack Slaughter who celebrated his 100th birthday at a gala event in Baltimore a few days ago.  At his side was his wife of 75 years, Bess, who is 97 years old.  They held their own during the festivities.”

Weber said “for many elderly Americans, Social Security is what puts food on their tables.  It’s their principal source of income, meager as it might be, and they would face cruel hardships if they their monthly checks were cut.”

He noted that there are numerous notions floating around Capitol Hill.  Some say Social Security doesn’t need fixing.  This despite the fact that the experts clearly warn that it does.

In fact, the Social Security Administration states flatly on its Web site that: “legislative changes are necessary to avoid disruptive consequences for beneficiaries and taxpayers. If lawmakers take action sooner rather than later, more options and more time will be available to phase in changes so that the public has adequate time to prepare. Earlier action will also help elected officials minimize adverse impacts on vulnerable populations, including lower-income workers and people already dependent on program benefits.”

Weber said that he’s “riled” by the attempts of some lawmakers to ignore the facts and those who seek to “obfuscate” the issue by suggesting solutions such as immigration reform on the theory that providing a pathway to citizenship will mean new workers and new funding.

“What we need is a real and dedicated solution for fixing Social Security, not pie-in-the-sky theories,” Weber said.  “And that solution is a simple three-part reform that includes fair and balanced age setbacks for future recipients, guaranteed minimum cost of living increases and a provision for a new personal Early Retirement Account (ERA).”

NOTE TO EDITORS: Dan Weber is available for telephone interviews on this issue.  Editors and reporters may contact John Grimaldi by phone at 917-846-8485 or via email at jpgrimaldi@verizon.net to set up a call.

ABOUT AMAC

The Association of Mature American Citizens [http://www.amac.us] is a vibrant, vital and conservative alternative to those organizations, such as AARP, that dominate the choices for mature Americans who want a say in the future of the nation.  Where those other organizations may boast of their power to set the agendas for their memberships, AMAC takes its marching orders from its members.  We act and speak on their behalf, protecting their interests, and offering a conservative insight on how to best solve the problems they face today.  Live long and make a difference by joining us today at http://amac.us/join-amac.

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Ken

I think an option is to take OASDI for the entire year from everyone (most lower paid individuals already do this). It would mostly hit the higher paid individuals but it would bring in more money. I was a computer guy. I’ve seen folks hit the max amount in February and then not pay anymore for the rest of the year.

charles williams

I hope that this will becom law in the near future.

Trish

WHY are the people who are voted in office NOT be held accountab;e when the wishes of the people are trashed in favor of some big “bonus”. Why are there not term limits and penalties for poor representation of the people who put them there? Why is there no huge outrage by seniors that both government and their media continue to lump social security in the same “goodie bag” as entitlements? How do we do something other than vote to redo immigration laws and enforce border security at all 4 b orders-voting is good but too seldom for some things and too often the “gimmees” are paid to stuff the ballot boxes.It is aggravating as all get out that we can’t enforce the USA is English speaking and if they can’t understand then learn or go back where they came from. Sooooo tired of seeing big black Cadillac Escalades with… Read more »

John

Take a good look at yourself and ask the question, After all these years ‘Have I made peace with God, do I simply BELIEVE JESUS?” More important than SS folks. Love you all!

JudyG46

There wouldn’t be such a problem if only the government had kept our SS payments in a separate fund for those who contributed and planned to use those funds at retirement.

Had they done what they should have, we’d be collecting more than we do now, and there would be safety for those in the future who contributed.

Shame on our government confiscating those funds and using them for other things.

Bill

I would like to see us all get paid what we and our employers put into SS and that’s it. We cannot afford the Ponzi scheme of Social Security.

Gary Ross

The federal government employs the best and the brightest minds that money can buy, and they didn’t see this coming? That makes me feel brighter than Einstein, because I did see it coming back in the 70’s when they were talking about what to do with all this excess SS money. They should have invested it, which would have strengthened the economy and had the program set for the future. Or they could have been a world lender for other countries instead of running up trillions in our national debt. But they didn’t do anything like that. Instead they stole from it to pay for pet political projects and gave it away to those who have no vested interest in the program. Well, they better make good on this contract with American citizens who worked and paid all our lives for this and Medicare by enacting their laws. This is… Read more »

Ron Hirschkind

Anyone who wants to get a true picture of America, should visit a social security office. The vast majority waiting to be served are not seniors. Many barely speak English. There is a war going on but NOT against women. It is being waged against seniors and one weapon against us IS social security. The longer we live the more of a burden seniors are being portrayed as being. For the most part, we’ve paid into the system and are deserving of our benefits.These are not”entitlements” as many would have the ignorant and uninformed believe. You work, you pay in, you retire, you get your money.Not everyone is fortunate enough to have made alot of money, invested well , remained healthy,or inherited well. Expecting everyone working to be able to invest wisely to have a bundle in their later years is an unreasonable proposition. Our rising prices and overall cost… Read more »

Stan

The only avenue open for repair of the Social Security System is to design a new plan for the younger folks while maintaining and guaranteeing the current plan for those already on it.

Jerry D

There is one other huge problem with the SS system that I don’t see anybody talking about. When I turned 66 years old a couple years ago I went to the Social Security Office to sign up for my benefits. I expected to see a bunch of grey hairs like me. I walked into a large room with service windows on the far side. The first thing I noticed was the armed guard near the entrance issuing numbers for service. There was a large screen TV on the front wall describing all the benefits available, the descriptions were in English and Spanish. My number was some 40 places back in line so I stepped to the back of the room and observed what was happening. I spent about 1 and 1/2 hours there. There were chairs lined up in rows facing the TV, so I looked at all the people… Read more »

Fred Loe

The main problem with social insecurity is we were never given the choice to put into it an now the solution is to Mean’s Test(what a joke!) you own your own business and pay twice the social security as owner and recipient then some politician says you get less of a benefit because you saved and made a profit plus you get to pay lots of taxes.Same thing with George Bush’s having people that earn more(that means works harder and smarter) and longer so we get to pay more for the same Medicare part B than everyone else pays who did not make a financial success.This is a form of blatant discrimination and I am tired of being called rich,mean spirited and callous.If only 47% are paying any federal tax and I am privileged to pay lots is it my fault I and my wife both have worked and saved… Read more »

Don Messer

I agree that this is a retirement fund. If the government paid ST back that was stolen from it, we wouldn’t have a found running out of money.

evans winter

You will not get a guaranteed payoff from the present system because it is a Ponzi scheme pure and simple. We now have fewer workers supporting more retirees, and everyone seems to expect salvation by decree—continued benefits (inflated over time) derived from politically unpopular base contribution levels (input) that always lag levels needed to sustain the promised benefits. The The entire economist/politician generated inflation/gross domestic product model is a sham, anyway—-buying power does not necessarily track the politically inspired rate of “inflation” and the assumed relationship of past and present units of production is based on a faulty premise that “production” (whatever that is) is produced by man-hours of labor—which it no longer is in this machine and information age.—- Ah, the woes of the economist, who does the best he can with the inadequate tools he has to work with. I learned as a sophomore to stay away from… Read more »

Meathead

SS is going to be hard to reestablish as a positive account. We currently have $127.592 Trillion in “Unfunded Liabilities” under SS, Medicare and Prescription Drug liabilities.
http://www.usdebtclock.org/

For reference:
$1 Trillion in $100 bills weighs 11,000 TONS. You do the math on our $17.353 Trillion debt and the above “Unfunded Liability” amount. BTW, there is an additional $5.1 Trillion debt that is “off balance sheet” and not reported.

Diana

I have jjust joined AMAC and am very glad I did. AARP’s lobbying power will soon be eclipsed by ours.Everyone’s being slammed by Obamacare etc.and I’ll chip in all I can to reverse America’s decline. Maybe not much, but all I can afford.

John Dickey

One way to save Social Security is to put it in an interest bearing account, and the only ones who can draw from it are the ones who paid into it. That is how it should have been done when it was set up. It was a Ponzi scheme from the beginning so the politicians would have more money to spend. There are illegals getting a bigger Social Security check each month than I am, and I paid into it all of my working life. George Bush tried to let people put 10% of their SS money into a private account, but the democrats wouldn’t allow that. If people who first start working could put 10% of their SS money into a private account, they would have much more coming to them in retirement than from the 90% SS. It is a ripoff the incumbents don’t want to give up.… Read more »

Jan

Fixing Social Security sounds good and is necessary BUT where does the money come from?

Connie Auran

My question of the day is: My husband lost a leg in Korea, then returned home, got a college degree and worked his fanning off for 40 years and paid into SS all that time. The only tine he even asked the VA for help was when he needed a new leg because they had the best that was available I cannot collect any of his SS because that would be double dipping I am told. I paid into SS all through high school and college with part time jobs. I am told I do not have enough hours to collect on my own and cannot collect on Walt’s SS.I am told this would be double dipping because I belonged to Pera ,a state Program while I worked for 20 years and now collect a small sum from them in retirement. Does this mean you can collect from more then… Read more »

Steve

I am a retired state employee, served in the military and also worked in private industry. I paid in social security while in the military and working in private industry. However I was severely penalized when I started drawing social security due to the windfall elimination provision. I am shorted hundreds of dollars each month as a result. I believe if one works extra jobs he should be eligible to receive benefits without penalties. I have called congressional representatives many times and they all indicate there have been bills to repeal this unfair provision, however they will say there are no funds even though Congress is in favor of repealing it and they add it is in committee which evidently is synonymous with the waste basket. I hope that AMAC is looking into this situation as many retirees and future retirees will be affected by this ridiculous law. I would… Read more »

Bob Mantei

If all of the politicians were put back on SS, how long would it take them to straighten out that program. Why do we give those politicians what we do when they retire or are voted out of office. I can see giving it to them for a couple of years, to give them time to get a job and get back into the swing of life the rest of are in everyday. They pasted obamacare so they could see what was in it, now let them live with it like all of us have to do. I have only been paying into SS for 52 years unlike a lot of you, I had no chose in it they took it out of my paycheck, it is not a benefit It is return of the money they took from me. I think it is time to get rid of all… Read more »