Health & Wellness

Understanding Rheumatoid Arthritis

What is Rheumatoid Arthritis?

Rheumatoid arthritis, or RA, is a form of inflammatory arthritis and an autoimmune disease. For reasons no one fully understands, in rheumatoid arthritis, the immune system – which is designed to protect our health by attacking foreign cells such as viruses and bacteria – instead attacks the body’s own tissues, specifically the synovium, a thin membrane that lines the joints. As a result of the attack, fluid builds up in the joints, causing pain in the joints and inflammation that’s systemic – meaning it can occur throughout the body.

Rheumatoid arthritis is a chronic disease, meaning it can’t be cured. Most people with RA experience intermittent bouts of intense disease activity, called flares.  In some people the disease is continuously active and gets worse over time. Others enjoy long periods of remission  – no disease activity or symptoms at all. Evidence shows that early diagnosis and aggressive treatment to put the disease into remission is the best means of avoiding joint destruction, organ damage and disability.

Signs and Symptons

The symptoms and course of rheumatoid arthritis vary from person to person and can change on a daily basis. Your joints may feel warm to the touch and you might notice a decreased range of motion, as well as inflammation, swelling and pain in the areas around the affected joints.  Rheumatoid arthritis is symmetrical, meaning if a joint on one side of the body is affected, the corresponding joint on the other side of the body is also involved. Because the inflammation is systemic, you’re likely to feel fatigued and you may become anemic, lose your appetite and run a low-grade fever.

Long-Term Effects

Rheumatoid arthritis may affect many different joints and cause damage to cartilage, tendons and ligaments – it can even wear away the ends of your bones. One common outcome is joint deformity and disability. Some people with RA develop rheumatoid nodules; lumps of tissue that form under the skin, often over bony areas exposed to pressure. These occur most often around the elbows but can be found elsewhere on the body, such as on the fingers, over the spine or on the heels. Over time, the inflammation that characterizes RA can also affect numerous organs and internal systems.

Who Get’s RA? 

An estimated 1.3 million people in the United States have RA – that’s almost 1 percent of the nation’s adult population. There are nearly three times as many women as men with the disease. In women, rheumatoid arthritis most commonly begins between the ages of 30 and 60. It often occurs later in life for men. However, even older teens and people in their 20s can get RA. As many as 300,000 children are diagnosed with a distinct but related form of inflammatory arthritis called juvenile arthritis. The disease occurs in all ethnic groups and in every part of the world.

AMAC recommends that you always consult your personal physician before making any health care decisions.

 

Leave a Reply

4 Comments on "Understanding Rheumatoid Arthritis"

Notify of

Sort by:   newest | oldest | most voted
Nancy
4 years 5 months ago

Doris what is Rapid Response.I have RA and would love to try some.

Bonnie
4 years 6 months ago

I can’t make a fist with my pointer finger on my right hand. On my left hand the pinkie is affected…I can’ t close it. Your article states that RA is symmetrical, I don’t have that symptom. Is what I have. Arthritis?

Rachel Verdon
4 years 6 months ago
The article above “Understanding Rheumatoid Arthritis” has a very misleading statement in it: “Rheumatoid arthritis, or RA, is a form of inflammatory arthritis and an autoimmune disease. For reasons NO ONE FULLY UNDERSTANDS, in rheumatoid arthritis, the immune system – which is designed to protect our health by attacking foreign cells such as viruses and bacteria – instead attacks the body’s own tissues, Much research has been done on this since the Founding of the National Multiple Sclerosis Society and the National Rheumatoid Arthritis Society in the 1940s and 1950s. See the Index Medicus for listings. New material has also surfaced on 1/3rd the world population carrying the HLA-DR genetic marker series 1-15. Bacterial intestinal and blood parisites such as brucellosis, rickettsialpox (a mild intestinal typhus), Lyme disease coupled with allergic dihpthyria vaccine reactions have been identified as the cause for inducing arthritis and MS. Lyme and brucellosis cell protein… Read more »
Doris Greif
4 years 6 months ago

I am taking Rapid Response and it is helping my RA!

wpDiscuz