Opinion

Fighting Pollution in America

A great deal is being made about the various man-made chemicals that are polluting our air and water.  We receive warnings about how harmful these pollutants are and the damage they cause.  Millions of dollars are being raised to protect the environment and clean up these hazardous materials.  All this is done for the common good.

This cause is now so popular that Republicans and Democrats, Liberals and Conservatives are making TV commercials together, rallying support to fight the common enemy – global warming.  Al Gore received a Nobel Prize for his environmental work.  Americans are rightly concerned.

But there is another type of pollution, one even more harmful to us than chemicals and radiation combined.  It hurts more pople than the largest environmental catastrophe.  It has taken more lives than the worst cancer-causing toxin.

It is the pollution of moral corruption.

Governor Elliot Spitzer is a recent victim.  His replacement was tainted with the same pollution.  A congressman from Staten Island, the former governor of New Jersey, and a mayor in the Midwest all stepped into the filth of sexual misconduct.  But Americans today don’t seem too concerned over this kind of pollution.  After all, if it was all right for a president to take advantage of an intern, these other incidents are relatively minor.  Perhaps it’s just part of our human nature.

The truth is, the moral pollution in America is a lot more serious than a few cases of infidelity.  Not a week passes that we don’t see a story about a young college student brutally raped then killed.  Or a child kidnapped, tortured, and murdered by a sexual predator.

How serious has this problem become?  To give you an idea, take a look at how many people are so dangerous that they have been classified as sexual predators.  More than 500,000 of our citizens – that’s a half a million people – are considered to be such a threat that they have to be registered.  The number keeps growing every day.  They live in every community; no area is immune to their potential threat.

The stench of sexual abuse is not found just in cults led by perverted leaders.  Have we forgotten about the priests and ministers who violated their position of trust to abuse young people?  When we read about another teacher who had sex with an underage student, it is hard to realize each time that it’s about a different teacher in a different part of the country.

Things will worsen unless we come to grips with this problem and recognize it as a harmful evil that must be stopped.  Until we realize that legalized pornography is more harmful than cigarette smoke, that the violation of sexual taboos is worse than carbon dioxide in the atmosphere, and that the marginalization of traditional marriage causes more trouble than DDT in the air, we are destined to suffer the consequences.

Those consequences are:  more victims of sexual attacks, an increase in the spread of sexually transmitted diseases (STDs), more AIDS victims, and a continued breakdown of the family, with all the associated ramifications.

None of us want to think about these things.  I had trouble writing about this problem and the editor suggested I tone down the message, saying it was too strong.  But, for some unknown reason I’m almost compelled to speak out.  Am I a monk who is too moral?

We can only pray to God that He will give us strength to do what is right.  ThereforeI will be forming Brother Juniper’s “Speak Out For Decency” league.  AMAC has kindly consented to help us get started.  If you would like to participate, email your name and address to AMAC at info@amac.us, attn: Brother Juniper.  God Bless You.

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